In the News

News from the National Association of Senior Move Managers

Aging in Place or Assisted Living Facility: Where do Retirees see Themselves Living?
Our goal with this study is to get a glimpse into where people plan on living as they age, in particular, do they want to age in place, that is, stay in their own home and community, or do they want to live in an assisted living facility. To do so, we asked over 2,300 adults ages 50 and older questions about where they plan on living as they get older and what they’ll do to make it as easy as possible.
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Baby Boomers Clearly Into The Fall And Winter Of Life Stages
Typically, people in marketing consider the life stages that matter most are event-based social life stage, such as school graduations, marriage, becoming parents, kids reaching their teen years, achievement of empty nester status and retirement. Those are all superficial life stages , important, but superficial. The fall and winter of life stages bring changing manifestations of human values, motivators and behaviors.
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How Retirement Housing Will Change for the Better
For a glimpse into the future of retirement communities and pardon the odious term “senior housing,” you couldn’t do much better than to ask Robert Kramer. He and several partners got together in 1991 to launch what has become the leading trade group for this industry, the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and Care (NIC), based in Annapolis, Md. And he has been a revered authority on this subject ever since.
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The Comforting Fictions of Dementia Care
The large central room of the memory-care unit was designed to look like an old-fashioned American town square. There was a small fountain, surrounded by plants and a low stone wall; there were a couple of lampposts, and benches, tables, and chairs set about. The carpet was mottled with darker and lighter shades of green, to resemble grass growing and bending in different directions.
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Baby Boomers are Struggling to Downsize and It Could Create the Next Housing Crisis
Veronica Dy and her husband had their retirement plan all mapped out. They recently sold their large family home in San Gabriel, California, for $850,000 and walked away with $250,000 in net proceeds to put toward a smaller home in Los Angeles to be closer to their son’s family. They figured it would be easy to find a quaint, two-bedroom home where they could age in place without overspending on housing.
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Forget ‘Senior Citizen’ — Aging Baby Boomers Search for Better Term
There’s a new way to describe old. It’s “perennial.” Not everyone likes it. Pam O’Brien, 69, thinks it’s contrived. Ms. O’Brien, who teaches full time in the Public and Professional Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh, says there are better, more appropriate terms. She personally doesn’t mind “elder,” as she is an elder at her church, along with other people ranging in age from the 30s to the 80s. But she’s not a fan of “elderly” and neither are her friends, who were upset when they were described by a younger couple as “the elderly couple.”
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Is the Assisted-Living Community Ready for Solo Agers and Baby Boomers?
Will the Baby Boomer generation have different requirements when they start to need aid and assistance? On the one hand, no. They will have the same needs for help with the basic activities of daily living, and what they can’t get at home or in the care of family, they will need to find elsewhere. Yes, Baby Boomers are living longer and healthier, but they will eventually encounter many of the same challenges previous generations have experienced: cancer, heart problems, falls, complications of diabetes, organ failure, etc.
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Obstacles to Downsizing: The Inner Sentimentalist
In a recent post, I wrote about some of the “voices” that keep me from moving forward with the task of downsizing. In that particular post, I talked about the voices of my “inner ecologist” and my “inner altruist.” And I promised to introduce you in a future post to my “inner collector” and my “inner archivist,” both of whom also have plenty of reasons (some, though not I, would say “excuses”) for not getting rid of certain kinds of things.
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Can We Fight Ageism Without Turning Our Backs on Ageism?
An unscientific poll of my friends and acquaintances suggests that every person over age 65 has experienced at least one “ah-ha” moment when they felt themselves being dragged, kicking and screaming, over the “age divide.”
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